Port of Antalya

Port Akdeniz is located near Kemer, in the west end of Antalya. It is connected by high standard motorways to main industrial and tourism centers like Alanya,Mersin, Konya, Akflehir, Afyon, Burdur, and Denizli. Together with the Antalya Airport, which has a high domestic and foreign passenger capacity, Port Akdeniz has a supplementary position for the region to become an essential logistics and transportation center.

www.portakdeniz.com
 
Latitude
26° 50' N
Longitude
030° 36' 5 N"
Time Zone
GMT +2
International Port Code
0207030
Admiralty Chart Number
INT3651 - 3221A-AD242

About Antalya

It is not known when the site of the current city was first inhabited. Attalos II, king of Pergamon, was believed to have founded the city around 150 BC, naming it Attalia and selecting it as a naval base for his powerful fleet. However, excavations in 2008 in the Doğu Garajı district of Antalya have uncovered remains dating to the 3rd century BC, suggesting that the city was founded earlier than previously supposed. Antalya became part of the Roman Republic in 133 BC when King Attalos III of Pergamum willed his kingdom to Rome at his death. The city grew and prospered during the Ancient Roman period.

Christianity started to spread in the region after 2nd century. Antalya was visited by Paul of Tarsus, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles: "From Perga, Paul and Barnabas went down to Attalia and sailed from there to Antioch after preaching in Pisidia and Pamphylia" (Acts 14:25-26).

Antalya was a major city in the Byzantine Empire. It was the capital of the Byzantine Theme of Carabisiani (Θέμα Kαραβησιάνων, Thema Karavēsianōn), which occupied the southern coasts of Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands. At the time of the accession of John II Comnenus (1118) it was an isolated outpost against the Turks, accessible only by sea.[2] The following year, with the aid of his commander-in-chief John Axuch, John II drove the Turks from the land routes to Antalya and reconnected the city with the rest of the empire.

The city, along with the surrounding region, was conquered by the Seljuk Turks in the early 13th century. Antalya was again the capital of the Turkish beylik of Teke between 1321-1423 until its conquest by the Ottomans

In the 19th century the population of Antalya increased as Turks from the Caucasus and the Balkans moved into Anatolia. By 1911 it was a city of about 25,000 people, including many Christians and Jews, still living in separate quarters, round the walled mina or port. The port was served by coasting steamers of the local companies only. Antalya (then Adalia) was picturesque, but ill-built and backward. The chief attraction for visitors to see was the city wall, outside which ran a promenade and partly survives to this day. The government offices and the houses of the better class were all outside the walls.

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